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Monthly Archives: December 2012

Police: Man had 34 guns, bomb-making materials

orange county bail bondsCOSTA MESA – Police arrested a 66-year-old Costa Mesa man suspected of living in a business unit where investigators discovered 34 firearms and materials that authorities say could have been used to make explosive devices.

Investigators received an anonymous tip that Baylor Maggenti was in possession of an “improvised explosive device and materials for making explosives” and was living in a unit within a commercial business park in the 1800 block of Whittier Avenue, a police statement said.

Costa Mesa investigators obtained a search warrant, and with the assistance of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Bomb Squad, began a search of the business unit about 6 p.m. Monday, police said.

During the search, police say they discovered “quantities of gun powder, fuse material and other materials sufficient to make improvised explosive devices.”

Authorities say no assembled or completed explosive devices were found.

It wasn’t immediately clear why the materials had been stockpiled in the unit.

Investigators also discovered 34 firearms during the search of the office unit, including “handguns and rifles, some semiautomatic and some commemorative or collectible in nature,” as well as a “short-barreled shotgun and a semiautomatic handgun with potentially illegal modifications,” the police statement said.

Maggenti was taken into custody Monday at the business unit and arrested on suspicion of unlawfully possessing explosive making materials. He was taken to the Costa Mesa city jail before being booked into the Orange County Jail.

Orange County Sheriff’s Department records show Maggenti, whose occupation is listed as “retired,” is being held in lieu of $150,000 bail.

Source: www.ocregister.com

By SEAN EMERY/ THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

If you are charged with a crime, contact an experienced Orange County Bail Bondsman to assist you in any bail situation.

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Charges reduced in Newport murder case

NEWPORT BEACH – Murder for financial gain has been taken off the table in the trial of a man accused of murdering his wife and dumping her body in San Diego County.

The special circumstance was dismissed on Tuesday in the case against Newport Beach resident Peter Chadwick, 48. Prosecutors said they did not have enough evidence to prove Chadwick argued with his wife about a possible divorce and related financial issues, though they would bring it up again if new information came to light.

On Oct. 10, neither Chadwick nor his wife, 46-year-old Quee Choo Chadwick, picked up their children at a school bus stop. Newport Beach police visited the couple’s two-story, ocean-view home, where they found signs of a struggle.

The next day, Peter Chadwick called San Diego police and said he was near the U.S.-Mexico border at San Ysidro. He was arrested by Newport Beach police later that day. Investigators discovered his wife’s body about a week later in a trash bin in Lakeside, a small suburb in San Diego County.

With the dismissal of the special circumstance, Chadwick is now being held in lieu of $1 million bail. His next court hearing is scheduled for March 1.

City News Service contributed to this report.

Source: www.ocregister.com

By CLAUDIA KOERNER/ THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

If you are charged with a crime, contact an experienced Orange County Bail Bondsman to assist you in any bail situation.

 

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Haidl, key player in Carona downfall, dies

NEWPORT BEACH – Don Haidl, a former assistant sheriff who was convicted of tax crimes and then cooperated with federal investigators in their case against convicted Sheriff Mike Carona, has died.

His family confirmed Haidl’s death in a brief statement.

“Our brother passed away unexpectedly last night,” said Peggy Haidl in a written statement released by the family Tuesday.

A multimillionaire from Newport Beach who was handpicked by Carona to head the department’s reserve program, he resigned from his post in 2005 to defend his son, Greg Haidl, in an infamous trial of the rape of an unconscious 17-year-old girl.

Haidl’s name would forever be entangled with Carona’s. A staunch supporter of Carona during the eventual sheriff’s rise, Haidl also played a key role in the former sheriff’s downfall.

After pleading guilty to tax crimes in 2007, where it was alleged he gave Carona cash and gifts, the former businessman began cooperating with federal investigators, eventually wearing a hidden microphone as Carona made incriminating statements about the federal investigation.

During the recorded conversation, the two men discussed coordinating their testimony to a grand jury about money that was being funneled to Carona.

A star witness during Carona’s federal trial, Haidl withdrew from the public eye afterward.

“He died as he lived, surrounded by the people he loved,” the family’s statement read. “He will be greatly missed by all who were privileged to know him.”

Source: www.ocregister.com

By SALVADOR HERNANDEZ/ THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

If you are charged with a crime, contact an experienced Orange County Bail Bondsman to assist you in any bail situation.

 

After shootings, cities talk school security

Following the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut, Costa Mesa and Newport Beach police discussed heightening school security with district officials on Tuesday.

Officials said they may build more fences around school buildings, reduce the number of entrances to each school, install security cameras and take other security measures.

“What a world we have become where our kids in kindergarten have to learn how to protect themselves against an intruder with a gun,” said Trustee Katrina Foley. “We want to change with the times, even though the times are changing in a tragic way.”

Newport Beach Deputy Chief David McGill said police are going to assess threats and security vulnerabilities at primary schools, applying the same scrutiny they use at junior high and high schools.

“This was an eye-opener in Connecticut, with an elementary school,” he said. “I mean for crying out loud.”

Many parents contacted the board members about fencing, some of the trustees said. While Tuesday’s meeting was announced on short notice, some parents and teachers also attended.

“In general, you need to be more vigilant,” said Laura Mayberry, an 11th-grade teacher at Corona del Mar High School, before the meeting.

She added that her campus is vulnerable. “It’s too open.”

But a few people said they were concerned about fortifying the schools.

“I think there’s an interesting and a healthy balance between a campus that feels secure to an extent, but doesn’t feel overly institutionalized,” Costa Mesa police Chief Tom Gazsi said.

Trustee Judy Franco drew a line in describing a school where every visitor has to buzz in at a locked exterior door.

“I think that goes too far,” she said.

One board member asked if it might be better to arm school employees.

“If someone … who was trained had access to a gun in a situation like this, maybe less damage would be done,” said trustee Karen Yelsey.

But the police chiefs essentially told her to leave it to the professionals.

Some of the trustees brought up concerns at individual campuses: Roy O. Anderson Elementary School is designed with open walls on the classrooms, and in some cases without doors; Newport Elementary School’s playground is not fenced, and beachgoers could wander onto campus.

Elizabeth Lapite, 49, a mother of two elementary-school students, suggested parents could train in law-enforcement measures and volunteer on campuses.

“Knowing that there are budget cuts and things were tight,” she said after the meeting, this could be one way to add security.

Because of city budget cuts in Costa Mesa, there are no officers patrolling the schools, while Newport Beach has school resource officers assigned to high schools and other campuses.

So the question of funding inevitably came up.

“Security guards at the door of every school might be a wonderful idea in terms of security,” said Deputy Superintendent Paul Reed, “but it will be a very costly trade-off in terms of teaching staff.”

The trustees appeared ready to invest in more security.

“All these things we’re talk about could be big expenses,” Yelsey said, “but we all, I think, agree that security and safety of our students is the utmost responsibility.”

Source: www.ocregister.com

By MIKE REICHER/ THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

If you are charged with a crime, contact an experienced Orange County Bail Bondsman to assist you in any bail situation.

 

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Man paroled in 1992 honors-student murder

A man convicted in the 1992 murder of an honors student in Buena Park has been granted parole.

Kirn Young Kim, 36, was 16 when he and four other teens carried out a plot to kill 17-year-old Stuart Tay. For his role as lookout during the brutal beating, he was tried as an adult and received a sentence of 25 years to life in prison.

Last year, a parole board granted Kim his release, a decision which was then reversed by Gov. Jerry Brown. Kim’s attorney appealed that reversal to the state’s 4th District Court of Appeal.

According to a court document, the governor reversed the board’s decision believing that Kim had not been honest about his role in the murder. To the parole board, however, the document went on to say that Kim had shown he was a model prisoner and presented psychological reports that said he proved a low risk for reoffending. Kim also told the board he took responsibility for his actions.

In an opinion, court officials noted Kim had no criminal record before the murder, and he had not been involved in gangs, drugs or alcohol. While in prison, he had furthered his education, avoided the need for discipline and received commendations from officers and staff.

The New Year’s Eve killing in 1992 received international attention and resulted in convictions of five teens, four of whom were tried as adults. During their trials in 1994, prosecutors said Sunny Hills High School student Robert Chan orchestrated the killing because he feared Tay would tell authorities about a plan to rob a computer salesman.

Along with Kim and Chan, Abraham Acosta, Mung Bong Kang and Charles Choe were prosecuted for the crime.

Source: www.ocregister.com

By CLAUDIA KOERNER/ THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

If you are charged with a crime, contact an experienced Orange County Bail Bondsman to assist you in any bail situation.

 

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Armed man robs San Clemente Ralphs

orange county bail bondsSAN CLEMENTE – Deputies are searching for an armed man who robbed a supermarket late Tuesday night.

The man pretended to be buying some items at the Ralphs on Camino de los Mares at about 11:20 p.m. but pulled out a silver handgun when the clerk opened the register, said Lt. Roland Chacon of the Orange County Sheriff’s.

No injuries were reported.

The man, described as being in his 40s, was seen leaving the area in a vehicle.

Source: www.ocregister.com

By SALVADOR HERNANDEZ/ THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

If you are charged with a crime, contact an experienced Orange County Bail Bondsman to assist you in any bail situation.

 

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Man flees after robbing Stanton gas station

STANTON – A man walked away with an undisclosed amount of cash Tuesday after demanding money from a clerk at a gas station, authorities said.

The robbery occurred at a 76 station in the 8200 block of Garden Grove Boulevard just after 9 p.m., said Lt. Roland Chacon of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department.

The man did not display a weapon during the robbery, Chacon said. “The man demanded all the cash and fled.”

The man was described as a Hispanic in his 20s, 6 feet tall with a thin build and wearing dark clothing.

Source: www.ocregister.com

By SALVADOR HERNANDEZ/ THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

If you are charged with a crime, contact an experienced Orange County Bail Bondsman to assist you in any bail situation.

 

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